Thursday, April 5th, 2012
Alaska Midnight Sun Tour To Nome And The Seward Peninsula

Wild Alaska Travel is organizing a unique tour  to Nome and the Seward Peninsula this summer, from Monday, June 18 through Sunday, June 25, 2012. Join me and explore one of Alaska’s most captivating landscapes, see the midnight sun, photograph muskoxen in the wild, visit an Eskimo village, take a dip in the Pilgrim Hot Springs, see the ‘Last Train to Nowhere’, experience the Midnight Sun Festival, participate in the Polar Bear Midnight Swim in the Bering Sea, pan for gold on Nome’s golden beaches, explore abandoned gold dredges and much more.  To learn more about the tour and for a detailed itinerary, please visit https://wildalaskatravel.com/alaska-midnight-sun-tour

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Wednesday, March 21st, 2012
Cape Darby, Seward Peninsula

The return flight from Nome to Anchorage and then Juneau last weekend was simply gorgeous. This aerial view shows the southern tip of the Seward Peninsula, with the prominent landmass in the foreground, Cape Darby. The frozen bay to the left of the cape is Golovin Bay, to the right of the cape is Norton Bay, with shore-fast sea ice visible along its coastline.

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Thursday, May 19th, 2005
Trail Markers

Traveled almost one hundred miles today on snowmachine to go climbing in the Kigluaik Mountains. These wooden tripods with reflective tape guided some of my way up the Kougourak Road. Such trail markers become vital when traveling across the Seward Peninsula or along the Bering Sea coast in marginal weather with poor visibility.

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Sunday, May 15th, 2005
Reindeer or Caribou?

Are these reindeer or caribou? Both are members of the same species, but reindeer are domesticated while caribou are not. I can tell them apart by looking at some of their physical attributes. Reindeer have shorter legs and are smaller than caribou. Reindeer also display much more variety of color, sometimes with pinto markings on their dark brown to whitish coats.

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Saturday, May 14th, 2005
Reindeer Grazing

Reindeer are not native to Alaska. In 1891, a Christian missionary imported sixteen Siberian reindeer to the Seward Peninsula and arranged for Lapp herders to come and teach reindeer herding to the Inupiat. The goal was to provide Native peoples a stable source of food as well as start them on a path to the cash economy through the sale of meat and hides. Today, independent Native herders raise about 25,000 reindeer in the vicinity of the Seward Peninsula. The most prized commodity of reindeer today are their antlers, which are sold to Asian buyers who ground them for use in traditional medicines and tonics.

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