Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011
Ground Blizzard At Eaglecrest

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Another wind event hit us this weekend, sand-blasting with face-freezing ice shards everything in its path. Looking up from our house in downtown Juneau towards Mount Roberts, I could see huge plumes of snow being blown off Gold Ridge. We happen to live in the windiest area of Juneau, as Mount Roberts and its adjacent ridges act as funnels for the winds blasting from the interior. The winds were significant up high on Douglas Island as well, and the drifting snow on top of Eaglecrest felt like a ground blizzard. Perfect start into spring in my book!

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Tuesday, March 15th, 2011
Eaglecrest Rime Ice

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It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to gauge the prevailing wind direction when looking at the rime ice on these hemlock trees up at Eaglecrest…

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Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011
Taku Winds

High winds are the most common extreme weather event in Southeast Alaska. In the downtown Juneau and Douglas areas, the mountainous terrain induces what are known locally as Taku winds. These winds occur an average of four times a year from October through April. Hurricane force wind gusts (72 mph or greater) occur roughly once every two years during these Taku wind events. Taku winds produce strong wind shear and turbulence that can affect the operation of air transportation. Taku winds can also cause dangerous marine weather conditions. Here, high winds cause snow plumes to drift off of Hog’s Back at Eaglecrest.

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Monday, February 28th, 2011
High Winds Pound Southeast Alaska

A couple walks their dogs along Sandy Beach in Douglas yesterday, undeterred by hurricane-force gusts that pounded channeled areas in Juneau and Douglas. The wind gusts exceeded 80 mph at the Douglas Harbor yesterday morning. The high winds, coupled with cold temperatures, caused windchills down to 20 below and colder. In Valdez, hurricane-force winds forced a shutdown of the port where Alaska oil is loaded onto tankers.

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Tuesday, January 11th, 2011
Wind Blasted

If it’s clear in Southeast, it’s likely to be windy too. This past weekend was no exception. As we descended to the top of the Cropley chute, wind gusts started to increase to around 40 mph, causing poor visibility in drifting snow. Here, Franz Mueter skis through blinding snow that sometimes felt like a mini tornado.

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