Monday, October 28th, 2013
Wrangell St. Elias National Park & Preserve

Wrangell St Elias National Park and Preserve Wilderness Aerial ---- Photo (c) Laurent Dick - Wild Alaska TravelSeeing the raw and wild mountains of Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve on my flight back to Juneau rekindled my desire to climb big mountains. I was fortunate to climb Canada’s highest peak, Mount Logan, several years ago. Mount Logan (5,959 m/19,551 feet) is located adjacent to this epic mountain world. I would love to explore one day some of the Alaskan peaks in this mountain range of Himalayan proportions.

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Saturday, July 9th, 2011
Wrangell-St. Elias Mountain Ranges

Wiewed from 30,000 feet, the Wrangell-St.Elias mountains look like little bumps on the glaciated landscape, however when viewed from the ground they are enormous. Below is an aerial view of the two highest peaks in the range, Mount St. Elias, elevation 18,008 feet, in the foreground, and Mount Logan, elevation 19,551. Mount Logan is believed to have the largest base circumference of any non-volcanic mountain on Earth, with the massif containing eleven peaks over 16,400 ft.

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Tuesday, June 28th, 2011
Malaspina Glacier – The Largest Piedmont Glacier In the World

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At the top of Alaska’s panhandle, among a mountain world full of superlatives, one feature tops it all: The mighty Malaspina Glacier, spilling from a funnel of rock in the St. Elias Mountains and spreading out to form a huge pancake between the mountains and the sea. This massive glacier is Alaska’s largest and also the largest “piedmont” glacier in the world. Piedmont glaciers occur where steep valley glaciers exit a mountain range onto flat plains or lowlands. They are no longer confined, and the ice spreads out in wide bulb-like lobes. It is about 40 miles wide and 28 miles long, with an area of some 1,500 square miles. Also visible in this aerial view taken from around 32,000 feet are, from left to right Mount St. Elias, elevation 18,008 feet, Mount Logan, Canada’s highest peak at 19,551 feet, and Mount Vancouver, elevation 15,787 feet.

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Saturday, June 11th, 2011
Icy Bay

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Icy Bay in the Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness west of Yakutat illustrates the rapid retreat of several glaciers during the past century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the bay entrance was permanently blocked by a giant tidewater glacier face that calved icebergs directly into the Gulf of Alaska. A century-long glacial retreat of, from left to right, the Guyot, Yahtse, and Tyndall Glaciers has opened a multi-armed bay more than 30 miles long. Icy Bay ranks on the top of my list of dream destinations to explore by sea kayak.

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